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Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will open its new special exhibit, “Holocaust by Bullets, Yahad-In Unum - 10 Years of Investigations,” with a reception and lecture on September 10, 2015 beginning at 5:30 p.m. The exhibit will run through December 31, 2015

Based on 10 years of research and investigation by the French organization Yahad-In Unum, the exhibit chronicles the lesser-known side of the Holocaust in which more than 2 million Jews were gunned down and left in unmarked mass graves across Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. “Holocaust by Bullets” will run through December 31 and is presented in English and Spanish.

The systematic killing of all Jews and Roma started before the creation of death camps and gas chambers and continued until WWII‘s end. More than 1,700 mass killing sites in Europe have been identified. Modern-day massacres in areas such as Cambodia, Rwanda, Darfur, the Balkans and Syria may be modeled on these village-by-village, on-site massacres perpetrated by the Nazis and others.

The exhibit’s opening reception will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Thurs., Sept. 10.   The lecture will begin at 6:30 p.m. with opening remarks by Kevin J. Farrell, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas. Yahad-In Unum Director Marco Gonzalez and Project Manager Alexis Kosarevskyi will provide a behind the scenes look at the organization’s operation.

Yahad-In Unum’s work deeply resonates with Gonzalez, who grew up in Guatemala where military dictatorships perpetrated systematic mass killings of an estimated 200,000 ethnic Mayans, mostly during the early 1980s. He is today responsible for a team of 27 professionals working in the Paris and Brussels offices, field team members located in Eastern Europe, researchers in Germany and Washington, D.C. and a network of volunteers and partners around the world.

Born in the Ukraine, Kosarevskyi trained directly under Father Patrick Desbois, president and founder of the organization, to lead the investigations on the ground. Today, he manages and coordinates an investigative team which travels to Eastern Europe several times a year.

The exhibition is presented and sponsored by the Catholic Diocese of Dallas. Special thanks to the Carl B. & Florence E. King Foundation and 70 kft.

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The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will present the rarely seen documentary film German Concentration Camps Factual Survey on Monday, August 3.

Beginning in 1944, cameramen documented the horrors discovered following the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps. The footage was so powerful and damning that propagandists determined it should be made into a documentary, which would condemn the Nazi regime, prevent denial and shame the German people into acceptance of the Allied occupation.

At the Ministry of Information in London, British media baron Sidney Bernstein assembled an expert team that included Alfred Hitchcock, but the film was eventually shelved. The Imperial War Museum began the process of restoring the film using the filmmaker’s rough cut, script and shot list. It premiered at the 2014 Berlin International Film Festival.

The film will begin at 7 p.m. at Cinemark 17 & IMAX Theatre at 11819 Webb Chapel Road in Dallas. A panel discussion will take place afterward. There is no cost to attend this event but RSVP is required due to limited seating. Please RSVP to rsvp@DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

For more information, call 214.741.7500 or visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The event is also sponsored by Academic Partnerships and Cinemark.

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A critically acclaimed touring exhibit in North Texas for the first time, “Ground Zero 360: Never Forget” honors the victims of 2001 terrorist attacks and commemorates the heroic lives of the New York City police officers, firefighters and other first responders who put themselves at risk to save others.

The exhibit at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will run through August 25, 2015. It is sponsored by the Communities Foundation of Texas and the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

Through harrowing visuals and heartbreaking “missing posters,” visitors are invited to step into the past to remember the tragedy that gripped the nation. Visitors may listen to the city’s previously unreleased emergency radio calls from that morning and touch a fragment of twisted steel I-beam and broken granite from the World Trade Center. Personal artifacts of police officers and firefighters who lost their lives at the World Trade Center, as well as crosses cut from the steel by ironworkers and a flag that flew over Ground Zero are on display.

Created by professional photographer Nicola McClean and her husband Paul McCormack, a former New York City Police officer, the exhibit showcases images taken by McClean in the days following the attack. Some personal effects of Officer Moira Smith are also part of the exhibition. She died while guiding dozens of people to safety from the burning World Trade Center, and she was the only female member of the New York Police Department to lose her life at Ground Zero.

A reception and film screening of the documentary “9/11” will begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Museum on Thursday, July 23. The movie will start at 6:30 p.m.

For more information, please visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

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A critically acclaimed touring exhibit in North Texas for the first time, “Ground Zero 360: Never Forget” honors the victims of 2001 terrorist attacks and commemorates the heroic lives of the New York City police officers, firefighters and other first responders who put themselves at risk to save others.

The exhibit at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will run through August 25, 2015. It is sponsored by the Communities Foundation of Texas and the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

Through harrowing visuals and heartbreaking “missing posters,” visitors are invited to step into the past to remember the tragedy that gripped the nation. Visitors may listen to the city’s previously unreleased emergency radio calls from that morning and touch a fragment of twisted steel I-beam and broken granite from the World Trade Center. Personal artifacts of police officers and firefighters who lost their lives at the World Trade Center, as well as crosses cut from the steel by ironworkers and a flag that flew over Ground Zero are on display.

Created by professional photographer Nicola McClean and her husband Paul McCormack, a former New York City Police officer, the exhibit showcases images taken by McClean in the days following the attack. Some personal effects of Officer Moira Smith are also part of the exhibition. She died while guiding dozens of people to safety from the burning World Trade Center, and she was the only female member of the New York Police Department to lose her life at Ground Zero.

A reception and film screening of the documentary “9/11” will begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Museum on Thursday, July 23. The movie will start at 6:30 p.m.

For more information, please visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

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When a skinhead punched Rabbi Michael Schudrich on a street in Warsaw, the Chief Rabbi of Poland punched him back. This is just one of the reasons why Poland needs him.

For centuries, Poland was home to the largest Jewish community in the world, but nearly 90 percent of that community was murdered during the Holocaust. Many who survived the Holocaust left, vowing never to return. Of those who stayed, many hid their Jewish roots. Consequently, generations of Poles have grown up not knowing their heritage.

Since the fall of communism in 1989, a growing number of Poles have learned of their Jewish roots. Rabbi Schudrich is the person they often turn to for help.

Rabbi Schudrich will discuss the rebirth of Polish Jewry as part of the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance’s Upstander Speaker Series on Thurs., June 4. The event will be held at the Jewish Community Center of Dallas, 7900 Northaven Road, Dallas, TX 75230. Tickets are available at Eventbrite.com.

Rabbi Schudrich, who is a New York native, is helping Polish citizens who have discovered their heritage as well as Jews outside of Poland who are beginning to learn about their Polish ancestors.

About 85 percent of American Jews have Polish roots, according to the New York-based YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Rabbi Schudrich estimates there are 30,000 to 40,000 people who now identify themselves as Jewish or have Jewish heritage in Poland.

“What is growing more than anti-Semitism is anti-anti-Semitism,” Rabbi Schudrich said recently from his home in Poland.

It was 2006 when Rabbi Schudrich was punched and pepper sprayed by the neo-Nazi on the streets of Warsaw. The man was quickly apprehended and spent two months in jail. He said nothing like that has happened before or since.

“It was an act that was certainly anti-Semitic, which is terrible, especially because it was on me," Rabbi Schudrich said wryly. "But more importantly was what was the reaction of the Polish leadership and of the Polish public. They were abhorred that someone had pepper sprayed the chief rabbi. When something went wrong the reaction is right.”

Poland has changed and is changing, Rabbi Schudrich said. The anti-Semitism of the pre-WWII era does not exist at those levels today.

Outside of Israel, Poland draws more Jewish visitors for Jewish reasons that any other country in the world.

“As a global issue, it’s a story of hope," Rabbi Schudrich said. “It’s a story of what democracy can do in a place that was devastated for 50 years.”

Rabbi Schudrich also served as rabbi of the Jewish Community of Japan from 1983 to 1989 and was involved in gaining recognition for Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat who disobeyed his government’s orders and issued visas that allowed 6,000 Jews to escape from Nazi-occupied territories via Japan in 1940.

For more information about Rabbi Schudrich’s lecture, please visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org or call 214.741.7500.

Series Sponsor: Real Time Resolutions

Supporting sponsors: The Dallas Morning News, G&H Ventures, LLC and Humanities Texas.

 This program is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will present An Evening with Mona Golabek, a custom performance by the renowned classical pianist at 7:30 p.m. on Wed., June 10 at the AT&T Performing Arts Center, Wyly Theatre in Dallas.

When Golabek performs, she hears her mother’s voice telling her to share “the spiritual power of great words and music to heal our souls.”  That’s why she often doesn’t simply play music.  She tells stories—especially her mother’s story. 

Mona’s mother, Lisa Jura, was also a classical pianist.  As a young girl living in Vienna during the Nazi occupation of Austria, she witnessed her father stripped naked and humiliated on the street, the horrific night of broken glass and aftermath of Kristallnacht, and her beloved piano teacher telling her he was no longer allowed to teach Jewish children. 

Her mother survived because she gained passage on the famed Kindertransport—a British rescue operation that enabled 10,000 primarily Jewish children to escape the Nazis.  Lisa would never see her parents again. 

When Lisa arrived in England, she was settled in a hostel with other refugee Jewish children who became her surrogate family and supporters as she began to pursue a music career.  She would ultimately succeed and pass on the gift of music to her children.

Mona wrote her mother’s story in her book, “The Children of Willesden Lane,” and her piano performance benefiting the Museum will be a custom rendition of the acclaimed stage play.

Tickets are available from $75 to $250 and proceeds benefit the Museum’s mission of teaching the moral and ethical response to prejudice, hatred and indifference. Visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org or call 214.741.7500 for more information.

 

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Michael Sam, the first openly gay football player to be drafted into the NFL, will speak as part of the Dallas Holocaust Museum's Upstander Speaker Series.

Whether you follow people who tear across the football field or tear up the dance floor, no doubt Michael Sam has been on your social media feed lately. Now you have a chance to hear what the multi-talented football player is up to in person.

Sam, the first openly gay man to be drafted into the NFL, will speak on March 26 as part of the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance’s 2015 Upstander Speaker Series. The series brings leading human rights advocates and academics to Dallas to share their knowledge and research on a spectrum of issues, including modern-day genocide, ethics, prejudice and law.

Sam set the Internet spinning when he announced recently that he’ll be a contestant on Season 20 of ABC's Dancing with the Stars. He’s stressed, though, that he’ll continue training so he can show off his moves on the football field if a team comes calling for the 2015 NFL season.

Sam has a lot going on, but he’ll stand still long enough on March 26 to speak to the North Texas community about his past whirlwind year and his decision to come out despite repercussions it may have on his career in the uber-macho world of professional sports.

Sam’s a natural for the Dallas Holocaust Museum’s second Upstander Speaker Series, which raises fundamental questions about humanity, justice and personal responsibility. It challenges audiences to consider these issues and stand up against injustice rather than stand by.

Sam grew up in Hitchcock, Tex. along the Gulf Coast. He is the seventh of eight children. Three of his siblings have died and two brothers are in prison. He is the first of his family to graduate from college.

Sam, now 25, was selected by the St. Louis Rams in last year's draft but was released before the start of the season. He was signed to the Dallas Cowboys practice squad but did not make it to the game-day roster.

The nation has followed Sam’s progress in the NFL closely.

"The President congratulates Michael Sam, the Rams and the NFL for taking an important step forward today in our Nation's journey," President Barack Obama said in a White House statement. "From the playing field to the corporate boardroom, LGBT Americans prove everyday that you should be judged by what you do and not who you are."

Sam has been accepted to the first NFL veteran combine, a project aimed at giving a second chance to players who are free agents. That combine is set for March 22.

The Upstander Speaker Series with Michael Sam and introduction by WFAA-TV sports anchor Dale Hansen will take place March 26 at 6:30 p.m. at Communities Foundation of Texas, 5500 Caruth Haven Lane in Dallas. For more information and tickets, visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

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The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance will open a new exhibit that chronicles the little-known story of Margret & H.A. Rey, the husband-wife team who created Curious George, and their escape from Paris during World War II.

The exhibit, “The Wartime Escape: Margret and H. A. Rey’s Journey from France,” opens February 12 with a reception at the Museum. More than a dozen learning activities for young children are planned at the Museum and with community partners to accompany the exhibit throughout its run. The activities include storytimes and arts and crafts among other fun events.

In 1940, while Margret & H.A. Rey were in Paris on their honeymoon, the Nazi army advanced into France, forcing the Jewish couple to flee the city. Among the few possessions they managed to take with them was the original manuscript of Curious George, a longtime fixture in children’s literature who continues to educate and entertain children today. The exhibit -- featuring colorful, age-appropriate drawings and a kids' reading area -- is suitable for families with young children.

"We're thrilled to be sharing this amazing story with the community," said Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance CEO Mary Pat Higgins. "What's especially exciting is that the exhibit appeals to visitors of all ages, providing a new perspective on this beloved character - and on this significant time in history."  

The opening reception begins at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 12 at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance. The exhibition runs from February 12 through June 20, 2015.

Additional activities related to the exhibit will be held throughout the spring for children, families and educators. For details visit dallasholocaustmuseum.org. 

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Ink and Blood One of Arthur Szyk's most iconic pieces, Ink and Blood, is represented in the Dallas Holocaust Museum's exhibit, Drawn to Action.

The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance is exhibiting more than fifty political and satirical illustrations by the famous artist, Arthur Szyk.  Open through Jan. 31, 2015, the special exhibition features the life and work of the man Eleanor Roosevelt called “a one man army” for the Allied cause.

When Hitler invaded Poland, Szyk (a Polish Jew) fiercely voiced his opposition through his meticulous and vivid illustrations. In 1940, Szyk left Europe for the United States. He continued his artistic endeavors in order "to alert and inform" the rest of the world about the severity of the conditions in Europe.

After the war, Szyk embraced the patriotism of his adopted country and was granted American citizenship in 1948. Ever the activist, he later used his talent to become a voice against Jim Crow, the KKK and lynching.

The exhibit is free with regular admission to the museum. To find out more information about the exhibit and the museum, visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

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Dr. Elizabeth White of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum speaks at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance on Oct. 7, 2014

Hatred and racism are timeless, but technology has made it easier than ever to spread vitriol without limit.

As part of the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance’s new exhibit, Fighting the Fires of Hate: America and the Nazi Book Burnings, Dr. Elizabeth White – a Holocaust and genocide scholar – will discuss this and other topics surrounding the dangerous power of hate speech at the Museum on Tues., Oct. 7 at 6:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

Dr. White is the research director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for the Prevention of Genocide in Washington, DC. She has worked for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Special Investigations and Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section where she directed research for civil and criminal cases against the perpetrators of genocide, war crimes, Nazi persecution, and other human rights violations. She also helped with interagency efforts to deny safe haven to human rights violators in the United States and developed effective strategies for preventing and responding to genocide and mass atrocity.

She has a PhD in history from the University of Virginia and is the author of many articles and papers, including German Influence in the Argentine Army, 1900–1945.

During her lecture entitled “Do Words Kill? Hate Speech, Propaganda, and Incitement to Genocide,” Dr. White will discuss what makes hate speech dangerous as well as new thinking about what gives words the power to promote violence. She will address the hallmarks of dangerous speech, what can be done to counter hate speech without restricting freedom of expression, where dangerous speech is occurring today and options for addressing it.

The lecture accompanies the Dallas Holocaust Museum’s new exhibit, which explores book burnings in Nazi Germany during World War II and America’s quick condemnation of the acts of censorship. The exhibit will run through Oct. 15.

On May 10, 1933, German university students burned tens of thousands of books as an “Action Against the Un-German Spirit.” Books burned included works by Helen Keller, Ernest Hemingway and Sigmund Freud.

The burnings horrified the American public and underscored German-Jewish writer Heinrich Heine’s 19th century warning, “Where one burns books, one soon burns people.”