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Join the Parade at Noon!

 

Put on your red, white, and blue; pack a picnic; come enjoy historic games, the annual carnival, and patriotic crafts; participate in the annual parade around the village; and make special memories with your family

 

Deck the family out in red, white, and blue, grab your picnic basket and little red wagon and come celebrate the nation’s past at Dallas Heritage Village’s Old Fashioned Fourth, Wednesday, July 4, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., (parade at noon), 1515 S. Harwood, Dallas, Texas  75215-1273.

Kids may decorate their wagons and bikes at the craft station for the popular patriotic parade around the village at noon, or they may decorate themselves and march in the parade.  The Junior Historians, teen volunteers at Dallas Heritage Village with a passion for history, will run the popular annual carnival which includes pick a duck, “go fishing” for prizes, bean bag toss, and the famous annual stick pony race for ages 3-11.  Additional activities include historic games such as horseshoes, graces, and checkers. Guests may pose for patriotic pictures with Mammoth Jack Donkeys Nip and Tuck and Waylon and Willie.  Throughout the village, musical performances will keep toes tapping. 

July 4 will be the last day for the Junior Historian’s preservation photography exhibit in Browder Springs Hall. The exhibit, titled “The Path of Preservation,” challenged each Junior Historian to take a look at preservation efforts in their own neighborhoods and choose a historic area to study and photograph for this new exhibit. Four Junior Historians participated: Kabilan Murugan, 14, featured Nash Farm in Grapevine; Lydia Radke, 15, featured the Music Room in Duncanville; Sarah Rutherford, 17, featured Old Frankford Church; and Kara Simmons, 14, featured Opal Lawrence Homestead.

“Don’t miss seeing this wonderful exhibit on its last day,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “They have done a fantastic job and learned that it is essential, not only in big cities, but also in the small communities surrounding them, to keep the past alive so that all may learn from it. Show your children a little about the past at our Old Fashioned Fourth festivities!”

All of the historic buildings will be open for touring, and costumed interpreters will be on hand to visit about what life in North Texas from 1840 to 1910. The Parlor, the Village’s exciting new early childhood learning space, will also be open for young ones to explore. The saloon is a popular afternoon spot for a cold root beer and a game of cards or dominoes. The Dallas Heritage Village Guild will be selling popcorn, cotton candy, and water bottles at the popcorn wagon.

“Old Fashioned Fourth features lots of fun activities for families and is an exciting time to come to Dallas Heritage Village,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director.  “Where else can you test your modern skills against a variety of Victorian era games, including the Junior Historian Carnival and its famous stick pony race? For many, this beloved annual event is a family tradition!  So come make some special memories with your family and see what’s new at Dallas Heritage Village.”

Admission is $5 for ages 13 and older.  Those 12 and under are free. Tickets can be purchased at the gate.  Don’t forget to bring a little extra cash for carnival fun.  Tickets for carnival games are 25 cents each or 5 for $1. For more information call (214) 421-5141 or visit www.dallasheritagevillage.org.

 

 

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Artifacts at Dallas Heritage Village

 

Artists from Cedars Union will teach attendees how to draw select artifacts from the Village’s collection

FIRST CLASS IS SATURDAY, JUNE 2

 

Cedars Union and Dallas Heritage Village have joined together to present Art ‘n‘ Facts, a new art class the first Saturday of every month at Dallas Heritage Village, from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Attendees will have the opportunity to work with a Cedars Union artist, who will teach them how to draw a selection of historic pieces from the Village’s collection. The first class will take place Saturday, June 2, in Browder Springs Hall at Dallas Heritage Village, 1515 S. Harwood Street. Attendees are asked to bring a sketchpad, pencils or other dry media.  A $10 fee covers the two-hour program and the opportunity to explore the Village following the class.

“Always looking to expand programming for our visitors as well as collaborations with our dynamic surrounding neighborhood, we recently discovered a fun way to combine two of our favorite things: art and artifacts,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “Many of our visitors inquire about our hidden collection, and it’s not unusual to see guests on the grounds with cameras or artist canvases. In this exciting partnership with Cedars Union artists, we are able to merge these interests into a fun and unique opportunity.”

A second art class will take place on Saturday, July 7 and will continue in September. The Village closes each year for the month of August.  Please register online at dallasheritagevillage.org/events or call 214-421-5141.

"This new partnership with Dallas Heritage Village aligns perfectly with The Cedars Union's mission to advance the arts in North Texas," said Consuelo Gutierrez, Director of Programs & Membership at The Cedars Union. "This will give emerging artists the opportunity to share their artistic skills and vision while creating meaningful experiences with a broader audience. It also gives them additional exposure to people from different communities outside of The CU while still staying close to their studios."

“We are very excited about this new program and hope it will inspire our guests,” added Prycer.  “There’s so much to see, learn, and draw throughout the Village’s 20 acres.  Join us for this fun new opportunity and explore your creative side while learning a little history.”

Dallas Heritage Village is an immersive history landscape that features a wide variety of authentic 19th century pioneer and Victorian homes and commercial buildings in Texas.  The Village is set on 20 acres with over 25 historic structures depicting life in Dallas from 1840-1910.  Dallas Heritage Village is one of only 5 nationally accredited museums in the Dallas area.  The Village showcases a Victorian Main Street, a railroad complex, a log cabin, a pre-Civil war home, an 1860’s farmstead with livestock, a 19th century church, schoolhouse and more.  Dallas Heritage Village has been recognized for multiple awards.  It is located at 1515 South Harwood, in the Cedars area with urban living and restaurants, near downtown Dallas and the popular Farmer’s Market complex.  Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m.  The Village is closed the months of January and August.  General Admission is $9 for adults, $7 for seniors 65+ and $5 for children ages 4 through 12 years.  Children under 4 and members of Dallas Heritage Village are admitted free of charge.  There is special pricing for groups of 15 or more people.  For more information call 214-421-5141, email info@dallasheritagevillage.org, or visit www.DallasHeritageVillage.org.

The Cedars Union, an incubator for the arts, was established as a 501 (c) 3 non-profit arts organization to help local artists take their practice to the next level. Its mission is to provide resources including studios, tools, programs, and pro-bono services for creatives, foster a collaborative and supportive artist community, and advance the arts in North Texas. The 40,000 sq. ft. building will host micro-studios, common work space, tools, equipment and classrooms for the use of all its members. Artists of all mediums will work side by side, being creative, and generating a unique synergy. With a staff that has decades of program experience on a national and local level, we hope to create an art program that will be a legacy for generations to come.

 

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Dallas Heritage Village Junior Historians Open a photography exhibit focusing on preservation in their own neighborhoods. Pictured are Kabilan Murugan, Kara Simmons, Sarah Rutherford, Lydia Radke.

 

The new exhibit at Dallas Heritage Village, which features Nash Farm in Grapevine, The Music Room in Duncanville, Frankford Church in Dallas, and the Opal Lawrence Farmstead in Mesquite, will remain open through July 4

 

Dallas Heritage Village Junior Historians Kabilan Murugan, 14; Lydia Radke, 15; Sarah Rutherford, 17; and Kara Simmons, 14, recently installed a new photography exhibit in Browder Springs Hall, at Dallas Heritage Village, 1515 S. Harwood St. in Dallas. The exhibit, titled “The Path of Preservation,” challenged each Junior Historian – teen volunteers at Dallas Heritage Village with a passion for history – to take a look at preservation efforts in their own neighborhoods and choose a historic area to study and photograph for this new exhibit.

“Our Junior Historian program has enabled our teen volunteers to help preserve our history with a specific focus on the history of the buildings at Dallas Heritage Village,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “We thought it would be fun for this year’s project to have them turn their gaze to preservation efforts in their own neighborhoods, allowing them to see that preservation is close to home.  We hope they have learned that it is essential, not only in big cities, but also in the small communities surrounding them, to keep the past alive so that all may learn from it.”

Kabilan Murugan, 14, of Lewisville, selected Nash Farm in Grapevine for his project. In 1859, Thomas Jefferson Nash and his wife, Elizabeth Mouser Nash, bought 450 acres of land in what is now Grapevine, and set up a farm. In 1869, they began building the main farmhouse, which still stands today, as does the barn which was first built in 1907. Mr. Nash died in 1906, but the house remained in the Nash family until the 1920s, when John William Nash sold it. In the 1940s, Edwin Pierce Williamson bought the homeplace portion of the farm and modernized it. In 2000, the Grapevine Heritage Foundation bought the 5.2 acre farmstead, including the main house, barn, and cemetery, and restored it to its previous state. It is still run as a farm to teach others about agricultural heritage.

“I enjoyed learning all about Nash Farm and was excited to see how this entire exhibit came together,” said Kabilan Murugan.  “It was fun exploring a project outside of Dallas Heritage Village, and it showed me the importance of history and preserving our past. It’s interesting to learn the stories of buildings and places that surround us.”

Lydia Radke, 15, lives in Duncanville and selected the Music Room, built circa 1890 to serve as a music classroom.  It was a separate building from the schoolhouse, allowing students to practice the piano without disturbing the children studying in the school. One of Duncanville’s only preserved historical buildings, the Music Room symbolizes the importance of education, history, and preservation.

“The Music Room is located at a park that I go to every week, and when I was little I loved to visit it,” said Lydia Radke.  “It is boarded up, and I always wanted to go inside.  Researching the building’s history and working on this exhibit was my way of ‘going inside.’”

Radke utilized newspaper articles found on the Internet as well as a book titled The History of Duncanville, Texas, published in 1976.  Additionally she spoke with the City Parks Superintendent about current and future preservation efforts.

“I enjoyed seeing all the old photos of my city that I found through my research,” added Radke. “Duncanville has come a long way.  It is amazing to think that the school music program started out with a small music room, and now there is a huge Duncanville High School Marching Band that has won many awards.  It was also interesting to learn about how much work needs to be put into preserving a building.” 

Sarah Rutherford, a resident of Dallas, selected Frankford Church for her focus.

“While working on the Junior Historian Project at Renner Schoolhouse several years ago, I ended up going to Frankford Cemetery for research,” said Rutherford. “The nearby Frankford Church intrigued me, and I was glad to have a chance to learn more about it.”

Frankford Church was built on a site that was part of the Shawnee Trail, a Native American path. Its use dates back to the 1400s. The location initially attracted migrating settlers due to the nearby freshwater springs, but it was not until 1852 that Captain W. C. McKamy founded the town of Frankford at the location. In 1892, as the settlement grew, he commissioned the Frankford Church building to be constructed by Philip Bethea Hamer in the Prairie Gothic Style to replace an earlier building that was destroyed. More than 100 years after its completion, Frankford Church is a visible reminder of the heritage left by early Texans and their commitment to their community.

“I learned a lot about the stories that historic buildings can tell. One of my favorite stories is about how Lionel Simpson used to put his feet up on the railing when he was at church meetings, and there are marks there today that are said to have been made by his boot spurs,” added Rutherford. “Little stories like that really made Frankford Church come alive.”

Kara C. Simmons, a resident of Mesquite, selected the Opal Lawrence Homestead for her project.

Stephen Decatur Lawrence founded the farm in 1874. He lived there with one wife who passed away, but he remarried. He had a total of 11 surviving children. His children continued to run the farm after his death. The last of his living daughters, Opal & Onyx Lawrence, donated the house and two acres of land to the city on their deaths in 1995. The city then purchased 11 additional acres of land to include the barn and outbuildings in order to show Mesquite's heritage. The architecture is considered Texas Prairie Vernacular style, and the home is an example of a house that grows with a family.     

“The Opal Lawrence Farmstead is a community icon and just recently opened,” said Kara Simmons. “Presently they are working on preservation of the wash house and curing shed/root cellar, and I enjoyed meeting with their historic preservationist Ron Siebler. When I visited the farmstead, he gave me an amazing tour of the preservation work and taught me a lot about preservation efforts.”

We are so impressed with the work of these Junior Historians and thrilled they learned so much and enjoyed their research of the various projects,” added Prycer. “Sarah Rutherford had commented that, ‘Even if these buildings do not turn into museums, they are still indicators of our past and inspirations for our future.’ I could not agree more. We must continue to learn and understand the importance of preserving our past. Bring your family out to Dallas Heritage Village, see this amazing exhibit and learn what life was like back in the nineteenth century.”

The exhibit will remain open through the Village’s Old Fashioned Fourth event on July 4.  The exhibit is free with regular admission rates, $9 adults; $7 seniors (65+), and $5 children, ages 4-12.  Under age 4, children are free.  Admission to Old Fashioned Fourth is $5, and kids 12 and under are free.

Dallas Heritage Village is an immersive history landscape that features a wide variety of authentic 19th century pioneer and Victorian homes and commercial buildings in Texas.  The Village is set on 20 acres with over 25 historic structures depicting life in Dallas from 1840-1910.  Dallas Heritage Village is one of only 5 nationally accredited museums in the Dallas area.  The Village showcases a Victorian Main Street, a railroad complex, a log cabin, a pre-Civil war home, an 1860’s farmstead with livestock, a 19th century church, schoolhouse and more.  Dallas Heritage Village has been recognized for multiple awards.  It is located at 1515 South Harwood, in the Cedars area with urban living and restaurants, near downtown Dallas and the popular Farmer’s Market complex.  Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m.  The Village is closed the months of January and August.  General Admission is $9 for adults, $7 for seniors 65+ and $5 for children ages 4 through 12 years.  Children under 4 and members of Dallas Heritage Village are admitted free of charge.  There is special pricing for groups of 15 or more people.  For more information call 214-421-5141, email info@dallasheritagevillage.org, or visit www.DallasHeritageVillage.org.

 

 

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SECRET DALLAS A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure

Author Mark Stuertz Presents His Book: Secret Dallas: A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure

FREE to the public, this lecture is presented by Dallas Heritage Village

 

Author Mark Stuertz will present his book Secret Dallas: A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure on Thursday, May 17, in Browder Springs Hall at Dallas Heritage Village, 1515 S. Harwood.  Doors open at 6:30, and the program begins at 7 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public.

Take an excursion through the weird, the wry, and the wonderful idiosyncrasies that comprise the Big D. From the Playboy Marfa bunny-with-a-muscle-car sculpture, to the ceaseless failed attempts to navigate the Trinity River, to the invention of the computer chip and German chocolate cake, Dallas is the birthplace of the whimsical, the wistful, and the profound.

Secret Dallas answers questions about Big D you never knew you had, catapulting you through a portfolio of little-known but fascinating people, places, episodes, and artifacts,” said Mark Stuertz.  “Think of it as a scavenger hunt travelogue, providing insights into hidden rhinestones and diamonds in the caliche. Secret Dallas is a riveting excursion into the city’s odds and ends, where the rare and the phenomenal express the big, the bold, and the brash in everyone.”

A nationally award-winning journalist and author, Mark Stuertz has been a Dallas-based writer for more than two decades. His investigative reporting, features, criticism, and business process articles have appeared in a variety of publications including the Dallas Observer, Modern Luxury Dallas, the Dallas Business Journal, Dapper, and Texas Monthly. He has also contributed to national publications including American Way, Spirit, Food & Wine, Wine Enthusiast, Wine Business Monthly, Private Air, and American Driver.

“Dallas Heritage Village is excited to welcome Mark Stuertz,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “Mark your calendar and join us for this fun and entertaining evening.”

 A book signing will follow his talk. For more information, visit www.dallasheritagevillage.org

 

 

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Renner School and Dallas Skyline

Dallas Heritage Village invites families to share in a fun day exploring architecture at this year’s History Quest: “We Built This City” on Saturday, May 5, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., 1515 S. Harwood Street.  This event will also feature the opening of a preservation photography exhibit by four of Dallas Heritage Village’s Junior Historians.

“It is not uncommon for our visitors to comment about the unique visual of the historic buildings at the Village with the modern skyline in the background,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “This year we thought it would be fun to focus on architectural elements and give our guests the opportunity to participate in hands-on activities, giving them a glimpse into what is involved in becoming architects.”

Stations throughout the Village will allow guests to participate in hands-on activities related to architecture. Activity stations will focus on style, materials, structure, ornaments, and livability: Style: character and appearance - create your own 2-D building by pasting various architectural styles together; Materials: matter and substances - touch and learn about different materials; Structure: weight supporting building elements - create your own or help build a community structure with toilet/paper towel rolls; Ornaments: decoration and details - touch and learn about different ornamentals, design your own; and Livability: health, safety, accessibility and wellness information station including details on greenhouses/gardening.

In Browder Springs Hall, the Village will showcase various architectural pieces from the museum’s collection as well as a preservation photography exhibit put together by four of Dallas Heritage Village’s Junior Historians. The historians selected preservation efforts in their own neighborhoods as the subjects of their photos:  Sarah Rutherford of Dallas photographed Old Frankford Church; Lydia Radke of Duncanville photographed The Music Room; Kara Simmons of Mesquite photographed the Opal Lawrence Home; and Kabilan Murugan of Lewisville photographed Nash Farm.  The photography exhibit will remain open at Dallas Heritage Village through July 4.

“We are so proud of our historians and their hard work on their individual photography projects,” added Prycer. “We hope you can join us for a fun day of learning, exploring, designing and appreciating architecture and preservation efforts across the area.”

History Quest discount tickets ($5 each) are available online through May 2. At the gate prices are $10/adult, $6/child and $8/senior, 65+.

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Author E.R. Bills will present his research and his book Texas Far and Wide: The Tornado with Eyes, Gettysburg’s Last Casualty, The Celestial Skipping Stone, and Other Tales on Thursday, March 22, in Browder Springs Hall at Dallas Heritage Village, 1515 S. Harwood.  Doors open at 6:30, and the program begins at 7 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public.

E.R. Bills is a freelance writer and journalist who received a degree in journalism from Texas State University. Born in Fort Worth and raised in Aledo, he is the author of Texas Obscurities: Stories of the Peculiar, Exceptional and Nefarious (The History Press, 2013), The 1910 Slocum Massacre: An Act of Genocide in East Texas (The History Press, 2014) , Black Holocaust: The Paris Horror and a Legacy of Texas Terror (Eakin Press, 2015), and most recently, Texas Far and Wide: The Tornado with Eyes, Gettysburg's Last Casualty, The Celestial Skipping Stone, and Other Tales (The History Press, 2017). His work has appeared in Fort Worth Weekly, Fort Worth Magazine, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the Austin American-Statesman and numerous other publications. He also recently co-edited Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers (Eakin Press, 2016).

In Texas Far and Wide, the sheer volume of remarkable Texan exploits creates a dizzying tally for the proudest of its citizens. So it happens that inexplicable marvels slip past an entire state of storytellers, and world-famous legends live as anonymous neighbors. Ever hear the story about the escaped ape in the Big Thicket? Or the “Interplanetary Capital of the Universe” that sat on the Gulf Coast? Does the cowboy hat that warmed U.S.-China relations ring a bell? From the Staked Plain Quakers to the Kaiser Burnout, E.R. Bills delves into some of the most fascinating chapters of overlooked Texas lore.

“Dallas Heritage Village is excited to welcome E.R. Bills,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “Mark your calendar and join us for this fun and entertaining evening.”

 A book signing will follow his talk. For more information, visit www.dallasheritagevillage.org

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Dallas Jazz Age Sunday Social Costume Contest at 2:30.

Don your best ’20s attire or walking whites and get ready to Charleston the afternoon away at the 5th Annual Dallas Jazz Age Sunday Social, at Dallas Heritage Village on  Sunday, March 18, noon – 5 p.m., 1515 S. Harwood, Dallas, Texas 75215. Gates open at noon.    Music begins at 12:30 p.m. at the bandstand. This jazz age-inspired lawn party, presented by Dallas Heritage Village and the Art Deco Society of Dallas,  will surround the Van Cleave Bandstand with an afternoon of live music by the 18-piece The Singapore Slingers and The Matt Tolentino Band, playing a repertoire of traditional jazz from the 1920s and 1930s. Guests may enjoy dancing, picnics, games, antique cars, photo booth, vintage vendors, ice cream, a costume contest, and more. 

Amelia Fox Trot will spin 78 rpm records on vintage phonographs, and an array of Model A Fords will be on display from Vintage Coach (also available for rides).  Guests may enjoy classic games such as croquet and horseshoes and tour the historic structures of the Village.  The Victorian Fencing Society will also be on site, and Elaine Hewlett from the Rhythm Room will be teaching vintage dance steps in front of the bandstand. There will be a costume contest at 2:30 p.m. for best “Lawn Party attire.”

Picnic, blankets and lawn chairs are welcome.  The Easy Slider Food Truck will be on site as well as Dallas Heritage Village’s vintage popcorn wagon, which will also be selling water. Vintage vendors to feature clothing, jewelry and antiques and include Ahoy! Cruises, Radio Dismuke, Savannah Hoffman Designs, and Old Fashioned Sweet Shoppe.

“One of our favorite events every year, the Jazz Age Sunday Social is the brainchild of our good friend Matt Tolentino of the Singapore Slingers,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village.  “It transforms the Village into a 1920s lawn party and picnic – fun for the whole family. Even if you choose not to dress up, half the fun is seeing everyone else’s costume choices. The costume contest is definitely a highlight for me every year.”

“Both New York and Los Angeles host huge and amazing Jazz Age-inspired lawn parties, and it’s my hope for Dallas to be on the same page,” added Matt Tolentino. “Dallas Heritage Village is the ideal setting with its lush greens, new bandstand and historic setting.  The Jazz Age Sunday Social offers something for everyone – couples, families, and all lovers of things vintage. “

For the Jazz Age Sunday Social, kids 12 and under free.  All others: $12. Tickets can be purchased online at www.dallasheritagevillage.org or at the gate.

 

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Games!

 

Take a trip back in time and see what life was like in the 19th century

Dallas Heritage Village hosts Spring Fling: A Day in the Life, beginning Saturday, March 10 – Saturday, March 17 (excluding Monday, March 11-the Village is closed all Mondays),at 1515 S. Harwood. Times for Tuesday-Saturday are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and for Sunday, noon-4 p.m.  

During “A Day in the Life,” children will discover the significant differences when comparing the way people lived in the 19th century as opposed to today.  There will be many fun hands-on activities during the day. Participants will have the opportunity to send a coded message through a telegraph – very different from using a cell phone.  They will also have a chance to clean a rug by beating the dust out of it instead of using a vacuum cleaner. Penmanship was also an important skill taught in school as there were no computer keyboards. Kids will get to see if they would score an “A” during a penmanship lesson and can also participate in a spelling bee. Additional activities include chopping wood, clothes washing, gardening, weaving, horseshoes, jacks, and hoops and graces. These are just a few of the many activities offered during Spring Fling, transporting young guests back to a different time.

“This is a perfect week to learn a bit of history, enjoy the great outdoors, and have lots of fun,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village.  “Our guests will surely leave more appreciative for the modern conveniences they have today after spending a day in the life of a 19th century family!”

Guests may also tour the Village throughout the week. Young shopkeepers, shoppers, and postal workers can have fun role playing at The Blum Brothers store.  Everyone enjoys stopping by to see Mammoth Jack Donkeys Nip and Tuck and Willie and Waylon as well as the sheep, who also like the attention.

Additional events occurring during Spring Fling are Barnyard Buddies Preschool Story Time (March 10 and 14) and Girl Scout Badge Workshop Day (March 10).  Barnyard Buddies will feature Little Blue Truck by Alice Schertle.  Following story time and a hands-on activity, attendees may enjoy time in the Village’s new early childhood interactive playspace, The Parlor, until 1 p.m. The cost for Barnyard Buddies is $5/child, aged 2+, $5/adult. Also beginning at 11 a.m. on March 10 is Girl Scout Badge Workshop Day. Daisies will earn their Gloria Petal, Brownies will earn their Making Friends Badge, and Juniors will earn their Social Butterfly Badge.  There will be special activities for scouts throughout the day, culminating with their own tea party.  Girl Scouts must be pre-registered by March 3. Badges are including in the price for the workshop: $15/scout; $5 adult; $5 siblings.

“March is an extremely busy time at Dallas Heritage Village, and we anticipate seeing a lot of families during these special events,” added Prycer. “Come see us, and make some memories with your family during this week!”

For Spring Fling, tickets are $9/ adults; $7/ seniors; $5 / kids 4-12, children 3 and under are free. For more information, go to www.dallasheritagevillage.org or call 214-421-5141.  Check in at Spring Fling via Facebook.  Leave your tips and reviews and let others know about all the fun things happening.

 

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Candlelight at Dallas Heritage Village Take a carriage ride pulled by Mammoth Jack Donkey brothers Willie and Waylon

 

A historic celebration for all ages, featuring Victorian carolers, carriage and hay rides, entertainment, St. Nicholas, home tours, American Flyer model train exhibit,

and treats and food trucks, with over 600 candles lighting the paths - Discount tickets available through Dec. 7

 

“Cultures of Candlelight,” the theme of the 46th annual Candlelight celebration will highlight the many cultures of 19th century families featured at Dallas Heritage Village, on Saturday, December 9 and Sunday, December 10, 3 – 9 p.m., 1515 S. Harwood St. This annual holiday event – the largest public fundraiser for Dallas Heritage Village – features carriage and hay wagon rides, holiday storytelling, Victorian carolers, musical entertainment, crafts, St. Nicholas, hand-weaving, blacksmithing, and many other festive activities such as the American Flyer model train exhibit in the Depot.

New this year in Browder Springs Hall will be a “Santas of the World” exhibit, including figurines and a selection of Victorian postcard interpretations of Santa.   A variety of historic buildings, circa 1840 to 1910, will be decorated for the holidays, and festive foods will be available for purchase from food trucks as well as a bake sale, traditional kettle korn, nuts and more.

The Village’s popular fall exhibit “Neighborhoods We Called Home” is also available to tour and will remain open through the end of December. A collaborative effort with the Dallas Jewish Historical Society, the Dallas Mexican American Historical League, and Remembering Black Dallas, Inc., the exhibit explores the historic neighborhoods of Dallas that served as strong, supportive communities for Jewish, Hispanic, and African-American Dallasites from the early 1900s and beyond.

“Neighborhoods We Called Home was the inspiration for this year’s Candlelight theme, highlighting the diverse cultures featured in historic structures throughout Dallas Heritage Village,” said Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “Attendees will enjoy exploring the three featured structures in this exhibit as well as all of our buildings, circa 1840-1910, which will be traditionally decorated for the holidays by area garden clubs and feature various activities such as cooking demonstrations.”

During Candlelight, pioneer and Victorian Texas is brought to life with costumed interpreters. At the 1860s Farmstead, attendees may see how early Dallas pioneers enjoyed a modest Christmas as the country approached the Civil War.  At the bonfire, Cowboys tell tales, and at the Alamo Saloon, root beer and games of dominoes are available. The candlelit paths provide a perfect opportunity to take a stroll and experience the many Cultures of Candlelight along the way. At the Depot, kids may tell St. Nicholas their Christmas wishes and see the American Flyer model train exhibit, operated by Ron Siebler. Village Donkeys Nip and Tuck will be posing for pictures, and our newest Mammoth Jack donkey team Willie and Waylon will offer guests carriage rides on the candlelit paths ($5).  Hayrides, pulled by a vintage tractor, are also available ($3 per rider).  Local musicians, dancers, bands, choirs, and storytellers will entertain at the Renner School (circa 1888), on the Main Street (circa 1900) stage, in the Pilot Grove Church (circa 1890).

“This event is a perfect opportunity to see and experience history while making special holiday memories,” added Prycer.  “One of the best things about Candlelight is that is offers something for all ages.  I love hearing grandparents share childhood memories and watching children enjoying activities and couples celebrating a cozy evening together – all in such a magical backdrop. With beautiful candlelit paths and activities across 20 acres, Candlelight offers a holiday experience like no other.”

All proceeds benefit museum programs at Dallas Heritage Village.  General admission (gate) is $12/adults, $10/seniors 65+ and $8/children, ages 4-12. Children under 4 are free. Tickets purchased online at www.DallasHeritageVillage.org by December 7 are $10/adults, $8/seniors 65+ and $6/children.  Visit http://www.dallasheritagevillage.org/candlelight for more details or call 214-421-5141. Self-parking is available for $5.

Sponsors include: Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District, Baylor Scott & White, Ron Siebler, Mrs. Charlotte Test, Mrs. Barbara Lake, Sue John, Primrose School of Preston Hollow, Ann Phy, McMurray Metals, Dr. Ken Hamlett, Dallas County Medical Society, Don Baynham, and KRLD 1080.

Sponsorships start at $500.  Contact Preston Cooley at 214-413-3662, pcooley@dallasheritagevillage.org.   

The Village’s historic structures are open for touring during regular museum hours throughout December.  Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.; Sunday, 12-4 p.m. (Closed on Monday). With the exception of December 9 and 10, parking is free throughout the season.

Watch these videos produced by Mark Birnbaum to see Candlelight and the Trains exhibit by Ron Siebler in 2016: https://vimeo.com/244871419  and https://vimeo.com/243593681

 

 

 

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Author Myra Hargrave McIlvain Free lecture at Dallas Heritage Village

Dallas Heritage Village presents Author Myra Hargrave McIlvain, speaking about her historical fiction novel Stein House, for the fifth annual Nancy Farina Lecture Series, a FREE event, on Thursday, Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m. (reception); 7 p.m. (presentation), honoring the late Farina, a 20-year employee of Dallas Heritage Village. The lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing, in Browder Springs Hall, at Dallas Heritage Village, 1515 S. Harwood, 75215.  Admission is free.

The Stein House reveals the history of a real Texas town through the lives of fictional characters. German immigrants are thrust into the bustling nineteenth century Texas seaport of Indianola, a lively town in 1853 that sat on Matagorda Bay, 40 miles from Victoria. German and other European settlers came in droves, and the town grew into a thriving seaport.  Unfortunately, two hurricanes almost exactly 10 years apart and a fire wiped the once-prosperous town off the map.  McIlvain’s novel follows the life of Helga Heinrich and her four children as they arrive from Germany and make a new life for themselves.  Helga, recently widowed, seeks the help of her sister’s husband to operate his boarding house and provide for her children.   Through her family’s point of view, readers learn about the diverse people who came through the boarding house and the community that served as the primary entry port for immigrants.  The story highlights the cruelties of yellow fever and slavery, the wrenching choices of Civil War and Reconstruction, murder, alcoholism and the devastation wrought by the hurricane of 1886.

“I am looking forward to speaking at Dallas Heritage Village and sharing “Stein House,” in which fictional characters come alive within the history of a real Texas town,” said McIlvain.  “Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres!”

McIlvain has been sharing her Texas tales for many years as a lecturer at The University of Texas OLLI Continuing Education Program and as a freelance writer for various newspapers and magazines such as “Texas Highways.”  Her books have won several awards.  “Stein House” was selected the winner of the 2014 General Fiction Award by the Texas Association of Authors; received a Kirkus Star Review in 2014; was one of four Indie books selected for the Kirkus Indie Book of the Month in the 9/15 Kirkus Reviews magazine; was named one of Kirkus Best of 2014; Best Adult Fiction, North Texas Book Festival in 2015; and a 2015 finalist for the Historical Fiction International Book Awards.

“We are so excited to welcome Ms. McIlvain to Dallas,” added Melissa Prycer, president and executive director, Dallas Heritage Village. “Little did we know at the time we invited McIlvain to Dallas Heritage Village, we would be experiencing so many hurricanes this year.  We can certainly relate to the tragedy experienced by the characters in her novel, devastated by two hurricanes 10 years apart.  We encourage the community to join us for this very special evening.”

The Nancy Farina Lecture Series honors Farina, who was a 20-year employee of Dallas Heritage Village. She served as vice president for development and capital giving for much of her tenure, which ended with her death in 2012. 

McIlvain lives in Austin with her husband Stroud. Her children are grown, and she enjoys the company of a houseful of grands.

Light refreshments and beverages will be served the event, which is free and open to the public.  Copies of McIlvain’s books will be for sale after the talk. For more information, visit www.dallasheritagevillage.org